A Match Made in the Code

Description: In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine?

Source: NYTimes.com

Date: Feb 1, 2013
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Yes, according to psychologists at eHarmony, an online company that claims its computerized algorithms will help match you with a “soul mate.” But this claim was criticized in a psychology journal last year by a team of academic researchers, who concluded that “no compelling evidence supports matching sites’ claims that mathematical algorithms work.”            Read Rest of Story 

 Questions for discussion:

1. In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine? Why or why not!

2.  Would you personally use a match-making site? Why or why not?

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25 thoughts on “A Match Made in the Code

  1. Landon

    This is an interesting topic. I would not really see myself on a dating website, mind you I did try it once but that did not last long. On one hand, a dating website is a beautiful thing, depending on what your view of “dating” is. A dating website is a significant aid in bringing like couples together, and somewhat takes the uncertainty factor out the whole thing. The major problem with finding a partner the “traditional” way is that you are never sure if the other individual is looking for a relationship, and what exactly they are looking for, until you take a major leap of faith. The dating websites kind of bridge this gap and cut straight to the chase. Another major advantage that dating websites provide is that they match you up, or at least try to, with the most compatible “other half” that suits your preferences and personality.

    On the other hand, dating websites take the fun out of the whole dating idea. Now you no longer have to go out and “reel in your own fish” so to speak. You don’t even have to speak face-to-face until you know you have a date “in the bag!”

    Reply
  2. Lindsey

    I think that filling out a random survey on the internet may not be any more scientific than attempting to contact st. Valentine, but I think utilizing EHarmony’s extensive network and database is infinitely more scientific and effective. I really appreciate how the article distinguishes between EHarmony’s marketing and it’s mission. It’s mission is not to create the most marriages – it’s to create connections. Relationships succeed and fail for many reasons, but sitting at home praying to st valentine isn’t going to make anything happen. But filling out the survey, and meeting up with the people it suggests is putting yourself out there. Even if it doesn’t work out with the person you are matched with, perhaps someone in their network is the “One” that you never would have met if it hadn’t been for EHarmony. People who are looking to date and find a relationship should definitely consider EHarmony. Science is based upon math, and dating is a numbers game. You have to play it in order to win, and praying won’t help.

    Reply
  3. Oyinkan Bakinson

    From a scientific point of view, it does seem to be more scientific. This brings us back to the age old question of science or religion. Scientifically speaking, you make a questionnaire (your hypothesis); people fill it out (test); a marriage happens (this technically proves the websites hypothesis). It is possible that there may be a correlation between their questionnaires and the successful matches that happen, but there is no way that this can be solidified into theory as the human mind is a very complex thing that can never really be fully understood.
    Personally I would never use a match-making website. I don’t put too much faith in them. It is easier for people to create false perceptions of themselves online than it is for them to do it person. I would rather look for dates myself than depend on a computer to do it for me, as I am sure that a questionnaire could never fully capture my personality nor any other person that it matches me up to. You may be compatible with someone due to similar interests but is there really chemistry? There are also a lot of people on those website because, “there are plenty fish in the sea.”

    Reply
  4. Matt Gough

    1. In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine? Why or why not!

    2. Would you personally use a match-making site? Why or why not

    Dating websites are just a way to help break the ice for a lot of people to meet. its a lot easier to talk and meet someone when you know they are interested in finding a partner. There is not just 1 person out there to have a relationship with but several people as long as you are willing to work and stay committed. By answering several questions about love they are just putting you in a file with people that have similar interests as you. every body now a days depends on their different forms of technology and dating sites bring the likes and dislikes of other people to you without even leaving your house. I personally would never use a dating site to find a mate. i would have issues believing things about the other person and would find it hard to trust what they were saying. i wouldn’t have the confidence needed in their “scientific” formula in finding someone that would work well for me. Dating sites just seem like the lazy mans way to avoid being stuck in an awkward situation and not having to ever put yourself out there. Also i am way to cheap to fork out $60 bucks a month on something that i can try do on my own for a lot cheaper.

    Reply
  5. Alexi Kubeczek

    1. In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine? Why or why not!
    Firstly, are we filling out a healthcare questionnaire, or genuinely trying to find another HUMAN BEING with whom we want to spend the rest of our life? Now, I’m no dating guru but, doesn’t already knowing all the answers to your questions about a person eliminate all of the fun out of dating? Now, there’s controversy among many people surrounding this topic but, the three quickest ways to get someone to notice you are 1) How you present yourself, 2) Your smell, and 3) Your ability to make them laugh. The third, being what captivates their attention. Basically, if they already know everything about you, and you already know everything about them, you’ll have to be incredibly creative in order to find things to talk about. ” Oh, hey! Did you see that new youtube trend, the ”Harlem Shake”? ” There’s only so many times you can talk about things you notice in a day. The fun part is discovering people down to their core. Now, that’s not to say that there isn’t room for that, even after the incredibly intrusive questionnaire. But, I like to play a little game of Sherlock Holmes with someone’s personality every once in a while. I don’t want to know everything right from the start.

    2. Would you personally use a match-making site? Why or why not?
    I think I would likely mess with the system like so:
    1) Make two accounts.
    2) Show interest in people with each account.
    3) Set up dates here and there.
    4) Watch as completely opposite people go on dates the way they should.
    5) Buy a Jugo Juice and call myself an un-matchmaker.

    Reply
  6. Janelle M

    I am nowhere near a hopeless romantic. So, in honesty, I think the idea of finding someone compatible online is a reasonable idea. There is nothing worse than having feelings for someone who has core values that completely disagree with your own. If the online matchmaking process is able to “eliminate” this incompatibility ahead of time, I think it’s a great advantage for dating. With work load and schedules becoming increasingly more demanding, and people becoming more reliant on media for communication, I could see how finding ways to meet a partner would be challenging. Where I would question its success would be in where eHarmony puts the most emphasis on compatibility. The problem is, not every person has the same priorities for specific areas in compatibility. It is rather presumptuous for an online site to determine which 5 categories matter most to all users. Thus, there could be some horrible matches within the successful “candidates”. It also takes every level of romance out of the process. There may be nothing worse than having to tell the grandkids that you met each other online. On the other hand, that story would certainly beat meeting at the local bar. Whatever the case, I’m just glad I’m not still on the market.

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  7. shaunagregus

    Online dating sites are just one more example of how technology is taking over our lives. Not only do we spend countless hours on social networking sites to make ourselves seem “likeable” to our friends, but now we can sit in our living room and meet someone halfway around the world who shares a bunch of interests. Although I personally would never use an online dating site. I can see the benefits and intrigue it holds for people who can’t meet the right people. Sometimes people are too busy or shy to go out an interact with new people. Without access to social interaction, they become somewhat desperate for attention. Online dating has provided an easy way to meet people with much less effort- no worrying about if the person you are talking to is interested in you or not: it’s clear that they are. It takes away the aspect of interaction, and physical emotions are just as important as psychological emotions. Going to an online dating site means that you have are willing to meet someone who is perfectly compatible with you, but who may not be your ideal “type” in regards to looks. Little habits they have that you would notice in a social setting (like a party or social event) go unnoticed online. This could set you up to discover things that you don’t like, but may choose to compromise on because they are supposed to be “perfect” for me.
    So no, I would not use an online dating site. I prefer to meet people in person, but I know that for some people it is a great answer.

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  8. Cody Nielsen

    To me, science doesn’t describe prayer, or give it the credit it deserves assuming that’s what is meant by praying to St. Valentine! I think it might be more scientific I suppose, but that doesn’t mean it works better than any other method. I personally wouldn’t use those services because for one, I’m married ha, and two, I enjoyed finding my wife through the dating and friends scene I was part of. It takes the importance of using face to face communication in relating and getting to know people, especially the girl you want to court. I do know that it has worked for many people, but for me I would have to be in a dire situation before I turned to a service I wasn’t really sure about. In today’s world though it seems people are interacting with others more so on a social media interface. I don’t feel I have stepped into the social media communication so much that I rely on it to provide me with relationships, but maybe that’s a sign of our times that we want others to do those things for us instead of putting ourselves out there. A lot can be learned from going after a lady you get totally shut down by! Why let a good learning experience go to waste because you’re scared of rejection?

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  9. Andrew Garlock

    I don’t really know what to say about this article. I was reminded about the psych 1000 course I took a while back, where the instructor loved to scoff and snigger about the site, and said that all of the questionnaires that it put out were totally bogus scientifically. I don’t know anything about how to make a scientific questionnaire for a study of relationships, but I’m sure if there is a correct way, that eHarmony would be the most motivated to use that correct way as much as possible. The article says that the other psychologists at the conference were dissatisfied with the work that had been presented, and that the secret algorithms meant nothing to them. I know from HR courses that we are taught to trust various questionnaires, as they scientifically reflect results that can be trusted. All in all, I assume that the eHarmony models do have some level of validity to them, and that the psychologists who combat the idea are just mad that they can’t do the research themselves because it is too expensive, and if they can’t do it, then no one can.

    As far as myself using a dating site such as eHarmony, I have only used the free version of Plenty of Fish. It didn’t work for me, there was far too few individuals online that I was even mildly interested in, and I left after a few weeks of awkward emails from people I didn’t really want to meet. However, I am aware that the online dating world is becoming far less stigmatized, and as a result more and more people are logging on. I would say that if I was single, and my current girlfriend was online, I wouldn’t be ashamed of signing up to go meet her, and would be doubly impressed if eHarmony could pick her out from a crowd and bring her right to me. As the man at the end of the article says, it’s a good place to find people who meet the criteria that you are looking for, and if they can make some suggestions for lining you up with the right person, then good for them.

    Reply
  10. James Perry

    I believe that filling out the 200 word questionnaire is more scientific than praying to St. Valentine. There are strategic formulas in extracting the specific information and collaborating that information with another set of similar answered questions submitted by another person and matching them together. And weeding out all the girls that you would supposidly not match up with. I personally would never use an online dating service, I like the old fashioned way of meeting a girl. Submitting a questionaire on the internet and haveing someone else match you up takes all the fun out of meeting girls face to face and finding your own soul mate. I know of people that have done the eharmony thing and it worked for them, but to each their own. Not my cup of tea. I have nothing against it, just personally thats not the route i would take. But in todays society everything is going the way of social media and people dont even have to leave their house to interact with people and let alone meet someone new. Society is getting lazy!!

    Reply
  11. Jordan Gibson

    1. In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine? Why or why not!
    I would have to say no on this one. I mean a questionnaire might go into more depth than a pray to St. Valentine but to me they present the same scientific information. Another thought that I had about the questionarre though, was at the fact that you have to go through each question individually, this may cause you to think critically and take a second to pause and find out what is is that you are really searching for. The St. Valentine pray, cleary does not present the same affect and the procedure to fill out a questionnare obvisously does not apply here.

    2. Would you personally use a match-making site? Why or why not?
    Personally, I would never use a match- making site. For one, you have no idea if the information that people present on their bio page is true or not. I actually know people that have tried them and most say they fail miserable. Know I’m not saying that they don’t work at all, but these are just things that I have heard. Most of my friends that have tried them have came back and said that the person didn’t really turn out to be what they were expecting. Again, maybe false information, maybe not. To me using a match-making site is a blind date that you, yourself are setting up. I am not comfortable with a normal blind date so a match-making site date does not appeal to me at all. As hard as it may be, I believe if you are patient enough you will eventually find a match made in heaven without searching for someone online.

    Reply
  12. Greg Goodwin

    Filling out a questionnaire on a website of course is more scientific than praying to St. Valentine because rather than just heading out and doing it the old fashioned way, you are now able yo narrow your search in a way that was never before possible – short of speed dating, which even then could be dicey. First off, you can search by gender, which SIGNIFICANTLY narrows the search, next by age range, then by spirituality, etc. Regardless of how compatible two people are, there are definitely some “deal breakers” that would seriously stifle a relationship. Even the simplest questionnaire is likely to take at least some of the guess work out of relationships.
    Personally, I wouldn’t – no. Not that I think there is anything wrong with that. I think you have to really want to find a mate for a dating site to work. I mean, I’m young, and not looking for anything serious, therefore, I would probably be wasting my time. Not to mention all the “catfish” and hypersexual beings that constantly sift through countless profiles on skeezy sites like PlentyofFish.com. It’s just not my cup of tea, but I think if I were seriously looking for a mate and was too busy or not having any luck on my own, I would definitely try a more professional online dating service, for sure.

    Reply
  13. Ida Draper

    From a scientific perspective, yes filling out a questionnaire is more accurate then praying to St. Valentine when it comes to finding a person you are compatible with. The questionnaires that the dating sites use are designed to match people based on their personality types and what they are looking for in return. I personally would not be interested in using an online site to help me meet someone. Between the wonderful knowledge of you never know who you are really meeting on the internet and if you have enough free time on your hands you could fake some of the information to make you look more desirable, it just seems like a poor way to meet someone. There is also the old saying of “distance makes the heart grow fonder”, more or less translates to you will find the person more attractive the longer you are apart or in the case of online dating, before you meet them. A source from the article is correct in the sense that online dating it the only place where you can meet at least 100 potential dating partners within the next 6 months. But I still see online dating as being rather hit and miss because people are not just attracted by personality types that are compatible but everyone also will seek a partner of a specific physical traits along with the physiological traits.

    Reply
  14. Nicole Freeman

    I enjoyed what the last commentator said. Whether or not the algorithm works to the extent e-harmony claims, its users must complete the registration process which includes 200 questions. I don’t know how many of you reading this has ever done the Myers-Briggs questionnaire, but filling that out took a lot of time. I wanted to seriously evaluate my true reactions so I would get an accurate score and that was for my own personal use! This questionnaire could possibly connect me with my future soul mate so I know I would be putting a lot of effort into answering accurately and so would others. So whether you believe in the science or not, you are able to connect with other people who are just as sincere about starting a relationship as you are. Like the guy said: “Where else can I meet 100 women?”
    I have found my soul mate and have been married 18 years so no, I would not use a dating site. That being said…if I were single and hadn’t found anyone even after joining sports teams and hobby groups, I certainly wouldn’t be opposed to the idea! I think I would simply make the first couple of encounters very casual in a setting with lots of people. ie: Starbucks!

    Reply
  15. prashant malik

    I think that these match making sites are all scam. Its just a way to make easy money . Finding someone’s life partner on the basis of some questions is just all lie. Yes the website can match you with someone with similar tastes , but that doesn’t mean that he or she is your match . Personally , I don’t want anyone to decide who my life partner would be. I would like to leave this decision for me . Until and unless you have met someone , you cant tell whether he or she is suitable for you . When I go out to a club or meet someone in my class , I can usually pick the people who I probably wouldn’t get along with apart from everyone else based on the way they behave, they way they talk, and what they talk about. I don’t like and i would never go online to find a date for myself because I haven’t seen the person before. It is just a photo am seeing and in many cases they always are not what they post on their pages. I would never use any dating sites because a person can lie about himself . You have no idea if the person that a dating website matched you with was being truthful when he or she answered the questions. Looking at the numbers , Only half a million out of 44 million is not impressive . I am sure , a person has a much better chance of finding true love your old fashioned way rather than depending on these websites. Biggest disadvantage of these websites is that people need to realize that a big part of any relationship is the chemistry that the two people have with one another. The problem with online dating is that, though the sites are making sure that these people are compatible, but if there is no chemistry between the two people, then more than likely there is no chance that the relationship is going to blossom. Also Equations can be wrong and make mistakes just like people do.

    Reply
  16. Kathie

    It would be nice if you could find the love of your life just by filling out a questionnaire, but that’s not going to happen. Sure, the website can match you with people who have similar characteristics, but having similar traits does not mean being compatible. When I meet people in person for the first time, whether it’s at school or out at the bar, I can usually pick the people who I probably wouldn’t get along with apart from everyone else based on the way they behave, they way they talk, and what they talk about. I don’t think that you really know how you feel about somebody until you’ve actually met them face to face. You could love who that person is online, but the way somebody acts online is not necessarily the way they will act in person. Also, a person can lie about their traits with the click of a button. You have no idea if the person that a dating website matched you with was being truthful when they answered their questions. Sometimes people will answer questions based on what they believe is seen as desirable, not based on their actual characteristics. Not only that but there are a lot of people who are using these websites who are so desperate for love in the first place that they will fall for anything these websites tell them. Half a million out of 44 million people found true love through a dating website. I’m sure if 44 million people were randomly paired up, half a million of them would find love anyway.

    Reply
  17. Helen Reina

    1. In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine? Why or why not!
    Comparing filling out a questionnaire on a web site and praying to St. Valentine, in my opinion the questionnaire is more scientific for sure. It gives you an explanation of the kind of match they do with your information and someone else´s and praying is more like a believe and expectation you have about something to happened but not all the times will happen so in this case it is less scientific than the matchmaking.

    2. Would you personally use a match-making site? Why or why not?
    I really do not think I will use that, even though it seems so convincing the steps it follows for me I will not use it, I prefer to take this decision by myself than left this decision to a matchmaking. Is better to meet the person and know how they are and after that having a better profile of the person start to see if you think this person will fits you. Also, if you think something will work because sometimes you do not need someone who is exactly like you or the opposite it just happens and that is it.

    Reply
  18. Haley

    Well first of all, who really cares about these web-sites? For all we know the founder of EHarmony could have created it just to make some money of these people who are desperate for love. It said 44 million people have used this service and only half a million have got married, Half a million sounds good but when you compare to the 44 million people using it that is a fairly insignificant amount of people. I think this is such a silly idea, to force a date between two people who are supposedly a “perfect match” for each other. What ever happened to meeting people face to face and going through the process of falling in love. And even more, is there even such thing as a perfect match. I highly doubt that, not everyone is perfect and not all relationships are perfect. That may be a fairly pessimistic way of thinking about it but society has just become so reliant on technology it is almost sickening! I could agree that it is a place were tons of people can come together and “meet”, but so is a mall, or a bar, or a zoo etc. You can meet people anywhere and everywhere and when you do meet then your not gonna say Hi my name is Jane, I like this about sex, I want to see you approximately this much, or anything like that and half the fun of falling in love with someone is finding out all those things about your partner. But I guess for some people EHarmony is a great or only way to meet people so good luck!

    Reply
  19. Jordan Slemp

    I like the paragraph at the very end of this article, “where else would I meet 100 women?” For that reason alone dating sites are much better than “praying to St. Valentine”. I am sceptical that an online site would be able to find you the love of your life. They said eHarmony has 44 million users and there has been only a few 100 thousand marriages produced. If it was as effective as they claim wouldn’t the number be around 50 percent? But for the fact that you get to meet a large number of potential partners in a very short period of time I could see this form of dating to be effective for many people.
    Personally I don’t think at this stage in my life I would try an online dating site. I personally don’t trust the information you would receive from others. It is way to easy to lie on a questionnaire. This could be intentional lies, or just lies because individuals are biased to give the answer people want to see and not necessarily the truth.

    Reply
  20. Edward Agyapong

    Again, personally i’d go for the filling of questionares on a dating website rather than praying to saint valentines for a date even though am not a big fun of these online dating sites. It is like you shopping online for a preferred item and after adding to your cart what you wish to purchase, the store suggests another object for your perusal and possible purchase. We dont always make the second purchase, why because it isn’t our choice or preference. I dont like and i wouldn’t go online to find a date because one, I havent seen the person before. It is just a photo am seeing and in many cases they always are not what they post on their pages. I’d rather walk into a social bar and have a face to face conversation with a lady on my choice, that is after a good view of her. I mean yes there might be ups and downs to the traditional procedure of face to face meeting but worst case scenario you might go home alone as you came in. My greatest reason for not choosing believing in online dating is that, aside the fact that these companies charge a hefty amount to hook people supposedly to be a perfect match up; there is always a percentage of fraudsters on this platform in to only scum these single people looking for soul mates.

    Reply
  21. Tayler Orban

    I think true love is something that is found the “old-fashioned” way because answering a bunch of questions and being matched to a person who answered those questions in a similar way is not true love it is a coincidence. There is a science to the website and it is more scientific than praying to St. Valentine because there are formulas involved and some research done versus praying to someone who might not even exist. I do not think that this science is legitimate I just think it is a cop out for people who are too lazy to actual make an attempt to meet someone in person. I would never use a match-making site because I do not trust people easily and I definitely would not trust someone who is sitting behind a computer screen. I think there is a good chance these people could be lying or answering the questionnaire to make them seem better than they are just so they can find a mate. People in older generations found their mates just fine and did not have any technology to do so.

    Reply
  22. Jessi Chrapko

    I’d say it would be more scientific in the conventional sense; numbers and algorithms are being used to quantify who your “soulmate” should be. However those that believe in religious aspects would probably be more likely to go with praying. Of course it could be considered absurd to completely rely on only one of either of these methods to decide on who you should marry. Things like some common sense, thinking for yourself, and meeting and dating people (in person) are all pretty obvious ways to possibly find someone you may choose to marry. E-harmony has become an effective way for some people to meet their “soulmate” largely because of the technological world we are now living in .

    As for personally using a match-making site, no probably not. Searching for a soulmate and getting married is not a priority in my life at this point. And if/when it becomes one, I don’t know how much confidence I would have in an equation to make such a decision for me. Equations can be wrong and make mistakes just like people do!

    Reply
  23. Lanre Paulissen

    It’s amazing how in this era of IT we have virtually handed over everything including finding a soul mate to ‘expert systems.’ But then if you give it some serious though, how else would most people be able to make a decision about such a crucial milestone in their life if they do not turn to or at least give such media or technology a trial? For the most part, people spend tons of time on social media with people they never met and most likely would never meet. Their online relationships seem to get along pretty fine; therefore, when it’s time to make a crucial decision of who to marry why wouldn’t such individuals turn to match making sites? What some of these people fail to realize is that the online experience is way different from real life.

    As regards the question, “In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine?” Either way, the subject is wielding a crucial decision to another to make on his/her behalf. As to science, praying to St. Valentine is not at all scientific but if the subject has an atom of spirituality, he probably might want to go for this option and thus allow St. Valentine whisper in a still small voice, “My son, Caro(n)line is your soul mate.” As good as that may sound for the spiritual individual, the little problem I have with that is even when most of the so called spiritual people pray, they already have a preconceived idea of the person they prefer but only praying as a matter of religion. So if St. Valentine actually speaks to the heart and the name the Saint pronounces is Moline, most people would still go for the Caroline.

    Now, to filling out a questionnaire on a website, I presume that is more scientific because at least an algorithm was developed to run the matches and present the best fits. The question is why would anyone leave such decision to pure science. Concurring with Mark Schmitz, I think a study should be conducted on the divorce rates for those who got together as a result of match-making sites. If the divorce rates for those who meet via these sites are significantly lower than for those who meet via conventional means then we can give some credence to the match-making sites.

    Would I personally use a match-making site? No! First, I’m not too much of a social media person. Second, I believe this is a decision of a life-time; I would rather take responsibility for that myself than allow some math equation do that for me.

    Reply
  24. mark schmitz

    I’m starting a new animal matchmaking website. It’s going to ask questions like “What do you like to eat?”, “Do you prefer hanging out in forests or open fields?”, and “Where do you get your food?” Its goal will be to get more animals together who otherwise wouldn’t leave their nest and get them into solid sustainable relationships.
    Online matchmaking websites were created to monetize on a perfectly normal problem that people have faced for years, and will continue to face for years to come. It will however be useful in the future when the “Facebook” generation becomes of age and are trying to find someone to marry (I should go buy some e Harmony stock).
    Looking at the simple stats at e Harmony-half a million marriages out of 44 million questioned- that’s a 2.3% marriage conversion rate; whoop-de-do. I’m pretty sure the human population can sustain a 2% rate on its own.
    I would think that the only way to measure such a dating revolution is to wait it out and look at the numbers. You would have to see when online matchmaking really exploded and how it impacted the divorce rates relative to the current stats, ceteris paribus.
    I wouldn’t use online website because I’m too human. According to Match.com, I’ve offended 1/5 people. I’m sorry.

    Reply
  25. Justeen Kolody

    I would say that this is just about the same, here is a website full of people seeking their “soul mate” and letting another means do the searching for them. If someone just has to answer questions and let something else do the searching for them it sort of seems the same to praying to St. Valentine. But this way seems to be much more effective. Dating site like e-harmony are quite brilliant, as people become more dependable on technology it seems as if people cannot find that special someone to spend their lives with. With this occurring it is much easier for them to answer questions and be automatically match up with how likeable one is, and ones level of agreeableness. E-harmony is quite brilliant to be able to gain a profit from others lack of social meeting skills with each member paying $60 per month.

    Just because they have an algorithm for matchmaking as they say, it is really any different then Netflix finding recommendations for you. Just find what is similar to your taste and suggest it to you. I mean worse case scenario you get date with someone new, whether it works or not is a completely different story.

    Reply

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