Monthly Archives: June 2013

How a ‘model’ employee outsourced his software job to China

Description: Bob was his company’s best software developer, got glowing performance reviews and earned more than $250,000 a year.

Source: www.theglobeandmail.com

Date: Jan 17, 2013

future-IT17sr1

Bob was paying a Chinese firm about $50,000 a year to do his work, then spent the day surfing the web, watching cat videos and updating his Facebook page.

“This particular case was pretty unique,” computer security investigator Andrew Valentine, who helped uncover Bob’s scheme, said in an e-mail to The Globe and Mail. “We thought it was actually pretty clever.”

Mr. Valentine made Bob’s tale public in a blog post on Monday and it has since been the talk of tech websites.    Read Rest of Story 

 Questions for discussion:

1. Is there an ethical dilemma in what Bob was doing at his place of work?  Why or Why Not??

2.  What benefits can you see with outsourcing as a company?

3.  What pitfalls can you see a company risking by outsourcing?

Advertisements

Doctor Found in a Box

Description: Imagine a quick, inexpensive trip to the doctor at all hours of the night.

Source: www.cnn.com

Date: Jan 15, 2013

20825-62480

click on link to watch video      http://cnn.com/video/?/video/tech/2013/01/15/dnt-oh-portable-doctors-office.wjw

 Questions for discussion:

1.  Do you feel that this type of health care has a bright future? Why or Why not?

2.  What situations would this type of medical care be most appropriate or advantageous?

Love Match Made in the Code

Description: In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine?

Source: NYTimes.com

Date: Feb 1, 2013
cyber-matching-mom.grid-4x2

Yes, according to psychologists at eHarmony, an online company that claims its computerized algorithms will help match you with a “soul mate.” But this claim was criticized in a psychology journal last year by a team of academic researchers, who concluded that “no compelling evidence supports matching sites’ claims that mathematical algorithms work.”            Read Rest of Story 

 Questions for discussion:

1. In the quest to find true love, is filling out a questionnaire on a Web site any more scientific than praying to St. Valentine? Why or why not!

2.  Would you personally use a match-making site? Why or why not?

Why Android Gets Apps Later Than IOS

Description: There are too many operating systems, devices, and models for app developers to keep up. This diversified market makes the future of apps look  more corporate than entrepreneurial.

Source: Mashable.com

Date: March 6, 2013

best-android-apps

Even though there are more Android phones than iPhones in the United States, the number and variety of Android apps lags compared to Apple’s offerings. For instance, Android users had to wait a year before they got Instagram or Pinterest apps. New research helps explain why.

There’s got to be more to the story than the number of phones. Flurry, a mobile-app analytics firm, released a report this week that helps explain the problem, laying out the challenges app developers face. It also shows that Android apps are unlikely to catch up and that small developers coding for either device will get squeezed out of the market READ REST OF STORY

 Questions for discussion:

1. Which operating systems or devices do you think would be most profitable for app developers to focus on?

2. How can app developers meet the needs of all users?

Concert Industry Struggles With ‘Bots’ That Siphon Off Tickets

Description:  As the summer concert season approaches, music fans and the concert industry that serves them have a common enemy in New York. And in Russia. And in India.  That enemy is the bot.

Source: nytimes.com

Date: May 26, 2013

rock concert

“Bots,” computer programs used by scalpers, are a hidden part of a miserable ritual that plays out online nearly every week in which tickets to hot shows seem to vanish instantly.

Long a mere nuisance to the live music industry, these cheap and widely available programs are now perhaps its most reviled foe, frustrating fans and feeding a multibillion-dollar secondary market for tickets.

According to Ticketmaster, bots have been used to buy more than 60 percent of the most desirable tickets for some shows; in a recent lawsuit, the company accused one group of scalpers of using bots to request up to 200,000 tickets a day. READ REST OF STORY 

Questions for discussion:

1.   Why should concert promoters care how the tickets are sold? Whether by scalpers or by actual fans?

2.  What do you feel is the best way to solve the “bot” problem?

How Companies Learn Your Secrets

Description:  “If we wanted to figure out if a customer is pregnant, even if she didn’t want us to know, can you do that? ”

Source: nytimes.com

Date: Feb 16, 2012

the-incredible-story-of-how-target-exposed-a-teen-girls-pregnancy

As the marketers explained to Pole — and as Pole later explained to me, back when we were still speaking and before Target told him to stop — new parents are a retailer’s holy grail. Most shoppers don’t buy everything they need at one store. Instead, they buy groceries at the grocery store and toys at the toy store, and they visit Target only when they need certain items they associate with Target — cleaning supplies, say, or new socks or a six-month supply of toilet paper. But Target sells everything from milk to stuffed animals to lawn furniture to electronics, so one of the company’s primary goals is convincing customers that the only store they need is Target. But it’s a tough message to get across, even with the most ingenious ad campaigns, because once consumers’ shopping habits are ingrained, it’s incredibly difficult to change them.  READ REST OF STORY 

 Questions for discussion:

1.  Are there any ethical dilemmas to using big data in consumer services?

2.  What other commercial applications can you see for organizations in using big data?

3. What skill would you need to be able to use Big Data in an organization that you work for?

Urine sample app lets users detect diseases with iPhones

Description:  The newest most cutting edge app allows users to test their urine for up to 25 diseases by simply peeing into a cup and taking a picture of a color-coded urinalysis strip.

Source: cnet.com

Date: Feb 27, 2013

Screen_Shot_2013-02-27_at_7.35.25_PM

Ever thought a smartphone could detect what was in your urine? Well, now it can. A new iPhone app, developed by MIT entrepreneur Myshkin Ingawale and unveiled at the TED conference this week, lets people take urine samples with their mobile device. Rest of Story

Questions for discussion:

1. Would you use this app?

2. What implications do you think Uchek may have on the healthcare industry?