Category Archives: internet uage

Internet of Things Changes Almost Everything

Description: Currently in the business world we are witnessing something like the epic collision of two galaxies — a rapid convergence of two very unlike systems that will cause the elements of both to realign. It’s all thanks to the Internet of Things.

Source: Harvard Business Review

Date: May 7, 2013

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If you are not familiar with the term, the Internet of Things refers to a dramatic development in the internet’s function: the fact that, even more than among people, it now enables communication among physical objects. By 2015, according to my own firm’s projections, not only will 75 percent of the world’s population have access to the internet. So will some six billion devices. The fact that there will be a global system of interconnected computer networks, sensors, actuators, and devices all using the internet protocol holds so much potential to change our lives that it is often referred to as the internet’s next generation.
For managers, this development creates challenges both long-term and urgent. They need to envision the valuable new offerings that become possible when the physical world is merged with the virtual world and potentially every physical object can be both intelligent and networked. And, starting now, they must create the organizations and web-based business models that can turn these ideas into reality.  READ REST OF STORY

Questions for discussion:
1. What is the INTERNET of THINGS and why is it important?
2. List some market technologies that you see around you that are part of this INTERNET of Things

The Digital Disparities Facing Lower-Income Teenagers

Description:  Teenagers in lower-income households have fewer desktop, laptop and tablet computers to use at home than their higher-income peers, according to a new study.

Source: NYTimes.com

Date: Nov 3, 2015

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One-fifth of teenagers in lower-income households reported that they never used computers for their homework — or used them less than once a month. And one-tenth of lower-income teenagers said they had only dial-up web access, an often slow and erratic Internet connection, at home. None of the higher-income youths said they had only dial-up access, according to the report.     Read Rest of Story 

 Questions for discussion:

  1. What is the digital divide, and is it problem?       Why?
  2. What is the solution to the digital divide?       Should the government be involved in the solution? Why or Why Not?

The World’s Coming Broadband Divide

Description: Business success, economic development and even international competition is starting to depend on once unimaginably fast Internet speeds.

Source: www.nytimes.com

Date:May 31, 2015

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On Tuesday, Charter Communications announced that it would spend, in two separate deals, a combined $67.1 billion to buy Bright House Networks and Time Warner Cable. A big reason for the deal was the opportunity to offer faster online services.

People will watch ultrahigh-definition television programs in one room, the argument runs, while broadcasting interactive video games in another and using a high-speed Wi-Fi terminal in a third. You can charge a lot for providing that kind of capability.   Read Rest of Story 

 Questions for discussion:

1. As Bandwidth has increased over the years can you think of any new or unforeseen businesses that have been created as a result of the increased bandwidth ?

2.  Do you see this “BROADBAND Divide to be an issue of concern for governments and business?  Why or Why Not?

“Model” employee outsources his software job to China

Description: Bob was his company’s best software developer, got glowing performance reviews and earned more than $250,000 a year.

Source: www.theglobeandmail.com

Date: Jan 17, 2013

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Bob was paying a Chinese firm about $50,000 a year to do his work, then spent the day surfing the web, watching cat videos and updating his Facebook page.

“This particular case was pretty unique,” computer security investigator Andrew Valentine, who helped uncover Bob’s scheme, said in an e-mail to The Globe and Mail. “We thought it was actually pretty clever.”

Mr. Valentine made Bob’s tale public in a blog post on Monday and it has since been the talk of tech websites.    Read Rest of Story 

 Questions for discussion:

1. Is there an ethical dilemma in what Bob was doing at his place of work?  Why or Why Not??

2.  What benefits can you see with outsourcing as a company?

3.  What pitfalls can you see a company risking by outsourcing?

Giving Viewers What They Want

Description: In the television business, there is no such thing as a sure thing. You can have a gold-plated director, a bankable star and a popular concept and still, it’s just a roll of the dice. Or is it?
Source: nytimes .com

Date: Feb 23, 2013


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Netflix, which has 27 million subscribers in the nation and 33 million worldwide, ran the numbers. It already knew that a healthy share had streamed the work of Mr. Fincher, the director of “The Social Network,” from beginning to end. And films featuring Mr. Spacey had always done well, as had the British version of “House of Cards.” With those three circles of interest, Netflix was able to find a Venn diagram intersection that suggested that buying the series would be a very good bet on original programming.

Big bets are now being informed by Big Data, and no one knows more about audiences than Netflix. A third of the downloads on the Internet during peak periods on any given day are devoted to streamed movies from the service, according to Sandvine, a networking provider. And last year, by some estimates, more people watched movies streamed online than on physical DVDs.  Read Rest of Story

Questions for Discussion:

1. Can Big Data be the silver bullet that can determine something as subjective as a what will bea hit TV show or Movie?  Why or Why Not?

2.  What other applications can you see Netflix using there vast amount data that could create revenue streams for the company?

A ‘model’ employee outsource his software job to China

Description: Bob was his company’s best software developer, got glowing performance reviews and earned more than $250,000 a year.

Source: www.theglobeandmail.com

Date: Jan 17, 2013

future-IT17sr1

Bob was paying a Chinese firm about $50,000 a year to do his work, then spent the day surfing the web, watching cat videos and updating his Facebook page.

“This particular case was pretty unique,” computer security investigator Andrew Valentine, who helped uncover Bob’s scheme, said in an e-mail to The Globe and Mail. “We thought it was actually pretty clever.”

Mr. Valentine made Bob’s tale public in a blog post on Monday and it has since been the talk of tech websites.    Read Rest of Story 

 Questions for discussion:

1. Is there an ethical dilemma in what Bob was doing at his place of work?  Why or Why Not??

2.  What benefits can you see with outsourcing as a company?

3.  What pitfalls can you see a company risking by outsourcing?

Old dotcom era gives way to new top-level domains

Description:  The dotcom era is ending, but not because of any sudden decline in online participation. Quite the opposite – over the next few months the internet will expand from 22 top-level domains to nearly 1400, including non-latin script domains for the first time.

Source: Sydney Morning Hearald

Date: Nov 3, 2013

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Hundreds of applications for the new generic top-level domain (gTLD) scheme – the largest expansion of web addresses since the internet’s inception – were received by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the body which oversees the organisation to internet address last year. The first of the granted new domains began rolling out last week.

In early 2012 hundreds of businesses governments and institutions were invited to apply providing they could afford the $US185,000 application fee, a $US25,000 yearly fee, prove an ability to manage domains, and endure several rounds of scrutiny. A total of 1930 applications were made for about 1100 names. Multiple applications for the same name will now go through a contention process and eventually end up at auction.  READ REST OF STORY 

 Questions for discussion:

1. What is the motivation for the internet to expand the number of top level domain names?

2.  Who are the winners and who are the losers in this process?  Why?