Tag Archives: mobile devices

How to Protect Your Privacy as More Apps Harvest Your Data

Description: In the real world, your personal life is a private space. But in tech, your personal data is a ripe resource for businesses to harvest in their own interests.

Source: nytimes.com

Date:May 1. 2017

When it comes to data collection, services like Unroll.me and Uber are small fry compared with internet giants like Google and Facebook, which have a wealth of information about people. And then there are large data brokers like Acxiom, CoreLogic, Datalogix and ID Analytics, which collect, analyze and sell billions of details about consumers’ online activities for marketing purposes.

For consumers, giving up some data has become part of the trade-off of receiving compelling, personalized services. But that doesn’t mean you have to be caught by surprise. Here are some tips from privacy experts on protecting yourself from tricky data collection.  read rest of story

Questions:
1.  Should we, as consumers have to give up personalized information to use a digital service?  Why or why not?

2.  How does one make sure that their personal data is being protected and is secure?

Half of teens think they’re addicted to their smartphones

Description:  A new poll that confirms just how much teens depend on their phones gives me even more to worry about.

Source: CNN.com

Date:May 3. 2016

Screenshot 2016-05-25 13.04.10 Screenshot 2016-05-25 13.03.59

Nearly 80% of teens in the new survey said they checked their phones hourly, and 72% said they felt the need to immediately respond to texts and social networking messages. Thirty-six percent of parents said they argued with their child daily about device use, and 77% of parents feel their children get distracted by their devices and don’t pay attention when they are together at least a few times per week.

Terry Greenwald, a father of three grown children, works as a custodian at a high school in Homer, Alaska, and said the hallways are often half-filled with “teenage zombies who are glued to their phones.”

They often walk near the walls so they can move from class to class without looking away from their screens, he said. “It gets interesting when they get to the stairways and the walls end for the stairway,” he said. “They don’t want to look up and they don’t way to tumble down the stairs but often just slow way down and inch along until they reach the wall just past the opening. They are often late to the next class, but that’s OK because they were successful at not diverting attention from their phone.”    read rest of story

 

 Questions:
1.  Do you feel their is a problem with too much use of smartphones in an individuals life?  Why?  or Why not?

You’re Not Just The Product, You’re The Ads (And Your Friends Should Thank You)

Description:  Word of mouth, sponsored. Trusted recommendations, promoted. Reviews from friends, endorsed. This is the new lexicon of advertising.

Source: techcrunch.com

Date: Oct 10, 2013

twitter-money

Facebook pioneered this social advertising model in 2011 with its “Sponsored Stories” ad units. Facebook’s filtered News Feed only shows you the most important posts about your friends. But if you Like a brand’s Page or post, check in at a business, download or use an app, or share a link, advertisers can pay to boost that action’s visibility in the feed or have it appear in sidebar ads.

Twitter has social ads too. Its “Promoted Tweets” show posts from businesses you don’t follow. To show these businesses are reputable and relevant the ads show the names of people you follow who follow that business. A Promoted Tweet from HP in my stream mentions three accounts I follow that follow it. Twitter doesn’t use your face, words, or content in its ads, though, and the social context is much less prominent than on Google and Facebook.

Combing social signals with advertising makes marketing seem less generic, which is important considering how many ads we see on a daily basis.  READ REST OF STORY 

 

Questions for discussion:

1. “Without ads, services like Google, Facebook, and Twitter might have to charge.”  Do you agree with this statement?  Why or Why not?

2.  What are the downsides of “you: becoming the ads?

Urine sample app lets users detect diseases with iPhones

Description:  The newest most cutting edge app allows users to test their urine for up to 25 diseases by simply peeing into a cup and taking a picture of a color-coded urinalysis strip.

Source: cnet.com

Date: Feb 27, 2013

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Ever thought a smartphone could detect what was in your urine? Well, now it can. A new iPhone app, developed by MIT entrepreneur Myshkin Ingawale and unveiled at the TED conference this week, lets people take urine samples with their mobile device. Rest of Story

Questions for discussion:

1. Would you use this app?

2. What implications do you think Uchek may have on the healthcare industry?

The Perils of Snapchat

Description:  CNN’s Samuel Burke looks at the new Snapchat Leaked website, which reveals people’s private photos.

Source: cnn.com

Date: May 31 2013

Snapchat-blog

Click on link to see video case

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/tech/2013/05/31/exp-idesk-snapchat-leaked.cnn.html

Questions for discussion:

1.  Do you see this issue with Snapchat as a problem? Why or Why not?

2.  What are some possible downsides of this service?

Why spend $1,600 for these glasses?

 

Source: CNN.com.com

Date: Feb 21, 2013

 Questions for discussion:

1. Do you feel this product will be a success in the marketplace?

2.  Will Google be rewarded for being a first mover in this hardware category the Apple was rewarded for being a first mover in the tablet marketspace?  Why or Why not?

3.  Would you buy a pair of these Google Glasses?  Why or why not?

Parents losing race to monitor kids’ social media activity

Description: Relieved your kids aren’t posting embarrassing messages and goofy self-portraits on Facebook? They’re probably doing it on Instagram and Snapchat instead.

Source: THEGLOBEANDMAIL.com

Date: March 18, 2013

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Educators say they have seen everything from kids using their mobile devices to circulate online videos of school drug searches to male students sharing nude pictures of their girlfriends. Most parents, they say, have no idea.

“What sex education used to be – it’s now the ‘technology talk’ we have to have with our kids,” said Rebecca Levey, a mother of 10-year-old twin daughters who runs a tween video review site called KidzVuz.com and blogs about technology and educations issues.

Eileen Patterson, a stay-at-home mom of eight kids in Burke, Va., said she used to consider herself fairly tech savvy and is frequently on Facebook, but was shocked to learn her kids could message their friends with just an iPod Touch. She counts nine wireless devices in her home and has taken to shutting off her home’s Wi-Fi after 9 p.m., but Patterson calls her attempt to keep tabs on her kids’ online activity “a war I’m slowly losing every day.”  READ REST OF STORY

 

Questions for discussion:

1. Do you feel parents should monitor their kids social media activity?  Why or Why Not

2.  What can parents do to secure their kid’s privacy and protection in the social media world?